Junior describes his 100-mile daily commute

Arce says he gets up every morning at 5:23 — more or less

While it was safe for him to do so -- we hope -- Tavo Arce snapped a selfie during one of his recent morning commutes to school.

Photo submitted

While it was safe for him to do so — we hope — Tavo Arce snapped a selfie during one of his recent morning commutes to school.

Nick Bozzelli-Levine, Reporter

The morning routine is something so ingrained in most students on the Hill that it often feels like clockwork. Waking up early, getting ready for the day and hopping in the car or bus can become an automatic process that students do without even thinking.

Some may enjoy the reliability of the regimen where others may complain about waking up early and driving to school for what can feel like an entire hour. For junior Octavio (Tavo) Arce, who lives in Columbus, Indiana, it really does take an hour.

Arce travels a total of more than 100 miles round trip to the Hill from his hometown of Columbus. A vital factor in Arce’s daily journey is, like for many students, keeping a strict schedule. “I get up every day at 5:23. Sometimes a little before, sometimes a little bit after,” Arce said. As it takes him about an hour to commute on an average day, this consistency keeps him on time and prepared for the day ahead.

In the winter, however, he has to get up even earlier.

In the colder months, Arce and his family have to roll out of bed sooner to allow more time for travel. “During the winter I have to get up at 5 or before; otherwise, we’d probably be late,” Arce said. “If it’s snowing we’d have to clear all the snow off the car and wait for the motor to heat up properly and then we’d still have to go slower because of the ice on the roads” 

The drive isn’t all bad, though.

Driven by their dad, Arce and his sister, senior Ana Cristina Arce-Ramirez, use their time productively. Arce said he finds the drive useful for completing homework that doesn’t require an internet connection. “It’s a good way to finish an assignment or catch up on your sleep,” Arce said. 

Students don’t just go to a high school 50 miles away for no reason.

They already knew how good Cathedral was, so they had me go there.”

— Junior Tavo Arce

Arce and his family were not originally considering coming to the Hill for high school. “My parents tried to find a good private school for my sister to go to and they found Cathedral,” Arce said. “They had my sister shadow to see how it is and she loved it.”

After Arce shadowed himself, the choice seemed pretty clear to him and his family. “When it was my turn to start high school, they already knew how good Cathedral was, so they had me go there,” Arce said.

To some, commuting an hour to high school every day might seem a bit absurd, if not just plain crazy. For Arce, it’s just another day. In keeping a positive attitude and a productive spirit, Arce manages to do what many would consider impossible. His dedication may make others think again before they complain about their morning routine.